Happy Birthday, US Marine Corps!

The few, the proud, the Marines…

Today, the US Marine Corps turns 242 years old. One of their early actions has provided much of the rich history of the Corps and it’s a story I love talking about.

Up until 1801, the Berber Muslims were extorting the US…forcing us to pay a tax or have our ships attacked when they were near North Africa.

It was written in their Koran, that all nations which had not acknowledged the Prophet were sinners, whom it was the right and duty of the faithful to plunder and enslave; and that every mussulman who was slain in this warfare was sure to go to paradise.

They eventually told President Jefferson that they were increasing the annual extortion fee, and took a ship full of Americans captive.

Jefferson respond by sending 8 Marines and 500 mercenaries in to take care of business in 1801.

This battle is immortalized in the US Marine Corps hymn “…shores of Tripoli…”, the Marine officer sword, and even the name “Leatherneck”.

Our Marines and mercenaries sent to the Barbary Coast (Tripoli) wore coats with heavy leather around the neck so that their heads wouldn’t get lopped off by the Barbary pirates’ swords. The name “Leatherneck” stuck, we beat down the pirates, took their sword design, and the rest is history. That’s a VERY condensed version of the story and I encourage you to read more about it when you get a chance.

With that in mind, what if I told you I had an affordable way for you to learn high speed pistol training from a combat decorated Force Recon Marine? (I’d say “former”, but there is no such thing as a “former” Marine 🙂

If you’re not familiar, Force Recon (or MARSOC, depending on the year) Marines are the dedicated special operations personnel who take on direct action, counterterrorism, and intelligence missions similar to US Army Special Forces, and US Navy SEALs.

Learn more about Force Recon Marine Chris Graham’s Pistol Training by clicking >HERE<

And, if you’ve already gone through Chris’ training, please forward this email to friends who haven’t.

Force Recon Marines are trained to work both within the traditional military hierarchy as teams and with other units, as well as completely alone and cut off in hostile territory for extended periods of time.

They’re part of a rare breed of modern operators who are selected and survive because they embody the ancient traits of a warrior. As Heraclitus said,

“Give me 100 soldiers.
Ten shouldn’t even be there,
eighty are just targets,
nine are the real fighters,
and we are lucky to have them,
for they make the battle.
Ah, but the one, one is a warrior,
and he will bring the others back.”

Chris is good at what he does…darn good…and because of that, in addition to still going downrange, he does pre-deployment training for elite US personnel, as well as close allies.

Like most high speed units, the guys that Chris trains all carry pistols…either as a secondary weapon when they’re running carbines or as a primary weapon when they “go native” and have to blend in.

And Chris demands a level of proficiency with the pistol that is rare in most military units–even elite ones. I’m talking about quickly training guys to be able to not only make short range precision shots, but also put accurate rounds on man sized target—with a pistol–at 100 yards or more.

Why’s that important?

Because if you have developed the skills to hit a man sized target at 100 yards with a Glock, how confident do you think you’ll be when facing an attacker at 10-20 feet?

Pretty darn confident, don’t you agree?

Well, I’ve got a special opportunity for you to get your hands on the at-home version of Chris’ pistol training program at an incredibly affordable price.

Keep in mind, this isn’t a course where you watch high speed guys do high speed live-fire drills while you sit on the couch with a beer in one hand, chips in your lap, and the remote in your other hand–this course was specifically designed from the ground up to be used at home. You’ll be learning and doing drills within the first 10 minutes that could easily change how you shoot for the rest of your life.

Learn more now by clicking >HERE<

If you need a little extra push, today, on the Marine Corps Birthday, we’re donating 10% of sales to the “Brothers In Arms Foundation” which supports wounded and fallen special operations Marines and their families.

Questions?  Comments?  Share them by commenting below…

5 Comments

  • left coast chuck

    Reply Reply November 10, 2017

    A couple of corrections. There are “former Marines”. You are a former Marine unless you were kicked out then you are an ex-marine.

    Secondly, the sword with the Mameluke hilt presented to Lt. Presley O’Bannon was presented by a Viceroy of the Ottoman Empire in gratitude for his actions against the Barbary pirates. It was made the official sword of all Marine Corps officers in 1825 by the then Commandant of the Marine Corps.

    As a former Marine, had to make those slight corrections to your narrative. If I make it a couple more years, I may become the oldest living former Marine in the country. This day 62 years ago I was at Tent Camp Two, Camp Joseph H. Pendleton, Oceanside, California awaiting transfer overseas to the Third Marine Division. We celebrated the Marine Corps Birthday in a Butler building that served as the mess hall for Tent Camp Two which was located off Basilone Road, named after Sergeant John Basilone. He was a recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor for his actions in defense of positions on Guadalcanal. He was nicknamed Machine Gun John because he was one of, if not THE, leading expert on the 1917 .30 caliber machine gun in use in the Marine Corps at that time. He modified it so that he could shoot it off hand and used that in a desperate defense of Edison Ridge where his machine gun platoon held off the Japanese Sendai Regiment, sending most of them to hell.

    At this late date I don’t remember if Tent Camp Two was part of Camp Onofre or was a separate camp. I believe Tent Camp Two also served as an initial refugee camp for the Vietnamese refugees our government abandoned when the Communists overran South Viet Nam.

    left coast chuck
    former Marine 1955 – 1963

    • Ox

      Reply Reply November 10, 2017

      Hey Chuck, I’m not going to argue with a Marine…current or former…about Corps history, but it’s my understanding from friends and family that you join the Army, join the Navy, join the Air Force, and you may join the Marine Corps, but you BECOME a Marine and once a Marine, always a Marine…unless you get a big chicken dinner.

      Thanks for the info on the sword, and it would be quite the honor to be the oldest living former Marine. Let me know as that develops.

      Ox

      • left coast chuck

        Reply Reply November 10, 2017

        If you don’t make it through boot camp you were never a Marine. If you make it through boot camp but get kicked out one way or another, you are an ex-Marine. I think it should be X-Marine, but most folks would find that confusing. Former Marines are folks who left the Marine Corps under honorable conditions but are no longer on active duty nor retired. The doctors say, “Well, your in good health” and then add the kicker, “For a man your age.” Despite rumors to the contrary, it is not true that I qualified at the rifle range in boot camp with a muzzle loader. It was a breach loader and we used those new fangled metallic cartridges.

  • Dan Hanke

    Reply Reply November 13, 2017

    U r both wrong sort of. There are Marines, then ex-marines (dishonorable discharge) and Marines not currently assigned to an active duty station! LOL! At least that’s what I learned in the Corps. No former Marines, just those not assigned to an active duty station! LOL!

    • Ox

      Reply Reply November 13, 2017

      LOL…I am not going to argue with either of you about Marine Corps history. But I do have to say that my experience with Marines is that for many, once they become a Marine, it permeates every facet of their being. They may leave the Corps, but the changes that the Corps made never go away.

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